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Metal Roofing that Looks Like Tile

  
  
  
  

metalconcrete

Concrete-based tiles and shakes are an incredibly common choice of roofing material here in northern Nevada, and they're not atypical in other parts of the country either (particularly in coastal applications thanks to their resistance to salt spray). As roof materials go, they have a few pros - good fire resistance, great resale value, decent hail damage resistance, decent resistance to general weathering and there's a certain aesthetic that lots of people like too - but more than a few cons too.

Earthquake damaged concrete roof | Metal Roof Network

  • The first big drawback to concrete-based tiles and shakes is the extreme weight. At 9-15 lbs/sq ft, the average roof weighs in around 36,000 pounds! Here in earthquake country, that seems downright treacherous (check out the shot of the home above, damaged during the big Northridge, CA quake). It's also an issue if you're considering concrete tile or shake as a replacement material and you don't currently have it, because structural engineering considerations may be required to support such a heavy load.
     
  • Then there's the high wind factor. Again, here in northern Nevada, we're no strangers to high winds, and those concrete tile and shake roofs that builders are so fond of here require nails, slips and/or wiring to keep them from blowing off - despite their weight.

  • Snow and ice can cause extreme damage too, because of their inherent brittleness, and environmentally, concrete-based roofs are just so-so.
Damage Concrete Roof

So what are your options if you're after this type of roof without the drawbacks? Why, metal roofing that looks like tile and shake, of course!
coated steel shake | Metal Roof Network

In fact, metal is the hands-down best choice for the look of tile with none of the weight of concrete. Plus, you'll get the inherent benefits of metal roofing too! Remember those concrete-based tile and shake cons, above? Compare that to metal roofing:
  • Extremely lightweight, about 1.4 lb/sq ft - so no structural considerations AND it can go over many existing roofing materials, eliminating the cost and environmental impact of tear-offs
     
  • Excellent 120 mph wind and hail damage warranties
     
  • Excellent resistance to damage from snow and ice, thanks to an interlocking design that resists ice damming
     
  • Excellent limited lifetime warranties and resistance to general weathering
     
  • Excellent environmentally - recyclable and made of recycled materials
     
  • Excellent re-sale value
When you make the comparison side by side like this, it's really a no-brainer. Metal roofs are better in nearly every regard and they'll last longer too. What's to consider? And whatever you do, don't make the mistake of assuming metal roofs are strictly for industrial or out-building applications.

coated steel tile | Metal Roof Network
Have more questions? Download our FREE re-roofing booklet via the link below, and find out more about metal roofing that looks like tile. Or call or click today and ask us specific questions - we're always happy to talk roofing.

Comments

I have a clay tile roofon my home that has developed some leaks over the years. I was thinking about replacement with a metal product that still keeps the rounded spanish style look. Do you have anyone in my area that I can talk to about my options? I live in Brush, Colorado 80723.Thanks.
Posted @ Monday, July 16, 2012 10:02 AM by Gil Perry
Hi Gil, thanks for the comment. We're happy to chat with you directly about your re-roofing options. If you're interested, we can do a virtual take-off for your roof's measurements, then help you find a local installer comfortable with our materials. Give us a call and let's get started!
Posted @ Wednesday, July 18, 2012 12:58 PM by Jessica
Will the metal roofing stand up to being pounded with golf balls. I live on a golf course and my tile roof has many broken tiles. I need something to help control the breakage.
Posted @ Tuesday, October 02, 2012 3:15 PM by Doylene McLaughlin
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